Posts Tagged ‘herbal medicine’

Editorial.

Editorial.

In seeking speaker proposals for the upcoming 8th International

Conference on Herbal Medicine it was encouraging to see just how much

complementary medicine (CM) research is being conducted around

Australia. In addition to university academics and undergraduates

carrying out vital research, many practitioners are returning to

undertake higher research and coursework degrees in specific areas of CM

research.

How much has CM research grown in the last ten years? In 2004

Bensoussan noted that despite its rapid growth, the CM industry did not

easily see the advantage of investing in research instead of marketing,

as companies were not able to protect medicines against negative

research findings. He further identified that funding agencies such as

the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the

Australian Research Council were hesitant to fund research in an area of

little understanding compared with conventional medicines. Bensoussan

proposed that if 5% of the GST raised from the estimated $160 million of

GST collected each year from sales of CM products was invested in CM

research annually over the next five years, this would create an annual

budget of approximately $8 million.

In November 2006 the Commonwealth Government did announce that it

would provide $5 million in funding through the NHMRC to investigate the

use and effectiveness of CMs. In 2008 funding of $1.74 million was

awarded to establish three National Institute of Complementary Medicine

Collaborative Centres and a further $5.3 million for 13 projects to be

funded by the NHMRC (www.nhmrc.gov.au).

Whilst $5 million of research funding is a small start, this

achievement followed USA’s example where $5 million was invested in

1995, followed in 2006 with the National Centre for Complementary and

Alternative Medicine investing $122 million into CM research and

integrated approaches to health care (European Federation for

Complementary and Alternative Medicine).

Sarris (2011) noted that whilst research into CM products is on the

rise, there is a real need for the study of naturopathic practice, its

outcomes and effectiveness as well as the safety of naturopathic and

herbal medicines. Sarris proposed an individualised research approach

applied to naturalistic practice to collect data from multiple samples

(or cases studies), or to be applied within a controlled design

comparing the outcomes of practice to usual care, standard conventional

care or other CM modalities. Sarris acknowledges that the method and

design of these studies would be difficult. Analysis of results would be

questionable due to them being uncontrolled; component/s which were

significant could not be separated from placebo; and all variables would

be further confounded by the level of the practitioner’s skill or

other individual characteristics.

Critics of CM claim that unlike studies of drugs derived from

plants, many funded studies lack a sound biological underpinning. For

example the National Centre for CM in the USA spent $374 000 to find

that inhaling lemon and lavender scents did not promote wound healing.

On the other hand, if the treatment was scientifically provable would it

continue to be classed as a complementary medicine?

On 1 July 2012 another four health professions joined

Australia’s National Registration and Accreditation Scheme:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practice, Chinese medicine,

medical radiation practice and occupational therapy (www.ahpra.gov.au).

Herbal medicine is unique in the CM industry as it has a solid basis for

scientific evidence, safety and efficacy of its practice. It is

therefore our hope that with the ongoing rigorous scientific validation

of our medicines and practice, and fidelity to our traditions, that we

will see our profession take its rightful and recognised place alongside

other medical and allied health practitioners within primary healthcare

in Australia.

References

Bensoussan A, Lewith GT. 2004. Complementary medicine research in

Australia: a strategy for the future. Med J Aust 181:6;331-3.

Sarris J. 2011. Whole system research of naturopathy and medical

herbalism for improving mood and reducing anxiety. Aust J Medical

Herbalism 23:3;116–9.

Department of Health and Ageing. Complementary medicine gets a

boost. accessed July 2012.

Anne Cowper BHSc (CompMed) DBM ND LFNHAA

Editor, Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine

PO Box 45 Concord West 2138

ajhm@nhaa.org.au

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - August 12, 2017 at 6:42 am

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Importance Of Medicine In Our Daily Lives

Importance Of Medicine In Our Daily Lives

Medicine is considered as one of the most important necessity to all of us. It is derived from the Latin words ars medicina meaning “the art of healing”. It is a branch of the health sciences and is the sector of public life concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, treatment and possible prevention of disease, injury and other damage to a body or mind.

It is both an area of knowledge, a science of body system and their diseases and treatment. This branch of science encompasses treatment by drugs, diet, exercise and other nonsurgical means. It is also used to maintain our health. An agent such as drug is used to treat disease or injury. There are different types of medicine, we have herbal medicine, which came from different kinds of plants, medicines treat in hospital and etc. Herbal medicine, also called botanical medicine or phytomedicine, refers to use of any plant’s seeds, berries, roots, leaves, bark, or flowers for medicinal purposes. Long practiced outside of conventional medicine, herbalism is becoming more mainstreams as up-to-date analysis and research show their value in the treatment and prevention of disease. Some of us believe in herbal medicines, for it is pure came from plants and no other ingredients. Herbal medicine also uses for cough, fever, toothache and some other diseases that might catch from our environment. Herbalists treat many conditions such as asthma, eczema, premenstrual syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, menopausal symptoms, chronic fatigue, and an irritable bowel syndrome among others. Plants had been used for medicinal purposes long before recorded history. For most herbs, the specific ingredient that causes a therapeutic effect is not known. Whole herbs contain many ingredients and it is likely that they work together to produce the desired medicinal effect

Some medicines may cause problems if you take them with other medicines. This is why it is important to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medicines you are taking. And some medicines can cause problems, even if you take them correctly. Call your doctor or pharmacist if you think your medicine is making you feel worse. We take medicine to make us feel better when we are sick.



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What Are The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Herbal Remedies?

What Are The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Herbal Remedies?

Herbal remedies are fast becoming popular even in our generation where everything seems to be governed by science. Herbal remedies or herbal medicine can be the first thing we try whenever we notice something wrong with our system, such as cough and colds. There are also times when we use herbs as our last resort, for example after we haven taken too many fat-burning pills.

We also use different herbal remedies for more serious ailments from ulcer and kidney stones to reproductive problems and even as a cure for cancer. Some doctors even encourage the use of herbal medicines – medically tested herbal medicines that is. Not all herbal remedies are advantageous and beneficial to our health. Some have no effect at all, while some may even cause greater damage.

It is better if you consult your doctor first before you randomly pluck leaves out of your backyard and brew it into tea. As I have said, some may not help you improve your health and may even get you sick. There are also a lot of herbal plants which are not safe for human beings to use. Anyway, in this article, we will list down the advantages and disadvantages of using herbal medicines or remedies.

Advantages

They have all-natural ingredients

Not all herbal remedies you pluck outside your backyard yes, but most herbal products, even those sold commercially, are made with all natural ingredients. These herbal medicines in the form of pills or tablets are guaranteed to contain ingredients which are extracted from the plant itself, or from any of its parts which contain the most essential components.

Since an herbal medicine is made from nature, it is very likely that it will not cause any drastic negative effects on your body. There might be a few pharmaceutical companies though that will mix some synthetic chemicals in the herbal pills but they are added to increase the effect. Otherwise, research before you buy an herbal medicine and make sure it has been approved by the government health agencies.

They give minimal side effects

Most herbal medicines do not give off unwanted side effects because they do not contain harmful chemicals. Instead, as what is stated above, they mostly contain harmless compounds found in nature. Herbal medicines are also less strong as compared to chemical drugs.

There is also less chance that you would develop an allergy reaction to an herbal medicine. Just make sure the herbal medicine you are using is made of one hundred percent natural ingredients and you are safe. However, if allergies have always been a problem no matter what you take in, it is wiser to consult your doctor first before going to the health store.

They cost significantly lower

This is one of the most obvious advantage of using herbal remedies. They are a lot cheaper (and I mean, a lot!) compared to their synthetic and man-made counterparts. The reason why they cost lower is because herbal medicines use natural ingredients and do not have to incorporate chemicals which cost higher than herbs.

Herbal remedies are also very readily available. You can plant a particular medicinal plant in your own garden and backyard so in case you will have to use it, you just have to prepare it in your kitchen. Why, you even saved yourself a trip to the health store!

Disadvantages

Their effects may take a while for you to see and feel

However, just like everything else we have in this world, herbal medicines also come with some negative aspects. Regular users of herbal remedies and medicines may have to agree with me on this, that most herbal treatments need a longer time for them to take effect fully. A person who is waiting for an herbal medicine to take its effect must possess great patience!

Then again, this is not because the herb or any of its ingredients are ineffective. They are just as effective but, especially if you bought a hundred percent natural medicine, they do not contain synthetic chemicals that are sometimes added to hasten the effect of the herb.

Some are not safe to use

Just as what I have said earlier, some herbs are not as safe to be taken and used by humans. Some herbs may not have any effect on our health while some may even cause diseases and sickness due to their poison content. Some of the herbs that are toxic and should be taken under professional supervision are borage, calamus, comfrey, chaparral and even the relatively innocent licorice.



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The History of Alternative Medicine

The History of Alternative Medicine

A New Fad or Steeped in Ancient History?

You may be new to using alternative medicine or sometimes you have already seen the amazing benefits alternative medicine and alternative therapies can bring to your life. But do you know how long its been practiced and where it originated? Well let me take you on a journey into the fascinating history of alternative medicine.

The history of Alternative Medicine is an interesting one and has links with many different cultures. However it's difficult to say exactly when Alternative Medicine began, in part because up until recently the practices that fall under this term were the conventional medical practices of their time. But if we go back in history and trace several of the forms of healing that are now labeled as alternative we find that their origins go back as much as 5000 years.

From Eastern Philosophy to Widely used Western Alternatives

One of the oldest forms of alternative medicine can be traced back through Chinese history. The ancient Chinese, in much the same way as alternative medicine is used today, based on their healing on the importance of the body and spirit being in balance. Much of the philosophy of Chinese Medicine is based on Taoist and Buddhist principles and the belief that a person and their environment are closely interlinked. The widely known principles of Yin and Yang come from Chinese Medicine and are integral to its practice. Yin and Yang explains how opposing forces are integral to each other and how for harmony within the body to take place, these must be in balance. When these are out of balance, disease occurs.

Chinese Medicine works at restoring balance in various ways including herbal medicine, acupuncture, breathing and movement (Tai Chi and Qigong) and also through diet. The practitioner looked at the patient's health and life in detail to ascertain where their life force or Qi (pronounced Qi) was out of balance. Various methods would then be used to restore the patient back to health. Such was the effectiveness of Chinese Traditional Medicine that it still forms a large part of modern health care in the East. It's not unusual for these "alternative" practices to be used in hospitals alongside western medicine.

The other Eastern Culture that has a long history of alternative medicine is India. Ayurvedic medicine dates back as far as 6000 years ago and like Chinese Medicine also has links with Buddhism. Ayurveda comes from 2 Sanskrit words – Ayu meaning life and veda meaning knowledge of. It is a system of medicine that keeps a persons body, mind and spirit in tune with nature in order to maintain good health.

When in Rome …..

In the West, the History of Alternative Medicine goes back around 3000 years. Treatments such as hydrotherapy were popular with the Romans and Greeks. The Ancient Greeks who were greatly influenced by the Babylonians and to a lesser extent by India and Chinarought herbalism into the West. Hippocrates (c. 460-377 BC), a Greek physician commonly referred to as Father of Medicine, practiced herbal medicine.

During the Middle Ages, Monks in Europe studied and boiled medicinal plants and translated many works on the subject from Arabic. Folk Healers also passed on their knowledge of healing through word of mouth, from Master to Apprentice. The understanding of the power different plants have is ingrained in many native civilizations and has allowed man to understand and thrive in often challenging environments. When the Europeans settled in America they found that the Native Americans had an extensive knowledge of the healing power of their indigenous herbs. Likewise the Aborigines in Australia understood the power of plants found in their environment.

Moving forward in time towards the 19th Century, before the rise of Western Medicine, as we now know it, medical practitioners were more like today's naturopaths. They would take a detailed medical history paying particular attention to the patient's lifestyle. They would then suggest ways to improve this by changes in diet, environment and would also prescribe herbal remedies.

How a Bit of Mold Turned the Tables on Alternative Medicine

The widespread use of alternative medicine in its various forms decreased during the 20th Century. Treatment of patients became more focused on the use of hospitals, and developments in modern medicine lead to the broad use of pharmaceutical drugs to treat disease. The discovery of Penicillin and its development into a drug that could treat bacterial infections in the 1940's revolutionized health care and alternative medicine lost favor with most medical practitioners.

Although many doctors let go of what they considered to be outdated treatments such as homeopathy, herbalism and traditional Chinese medicine many patients still sort out them, especially when conventional medicine did not appear to be working for them.

No Longer An Alternative, Now Another Choice for Achieving Better Health

The result now is that Alternative Medicine is on the increase. Practices such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, aromatherapy and healing are kept alive by practitioners who specialize in one of more alternative form of treatment. Frequent alternatives are used alongside modern medical treatments, which have led to alternatives being given the term complimentary medicine.

This brief history of alternative medicine shows that many of the practices used today have been with us for thousands of years. Given the rising popularity of using alternative medicine to deal with health issues today, it's likely that these practices will be around for many more.



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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 14, 2017 at 6:20 am

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The History of Alternative Medicine

The History of Alternative Medicine

A New Fad or Steeped in Ancient History?

You may be new to using alternative medicine or sometimes you have already seen the amazing benefits alternative medicine and alternative therapies can bring to your life. But do you know how long its been practiced and where it originated? Well let me take you on a journey into the fascinating history of alternative medicine.

The history of Alternative Medicine is an interesting one and has links with many different cultures. However it's difficult to say exactly when Alternative Medicine began, in part because up until recently the practices that fall under this term were the conventional medical practices of their time. But if we go back in history and trace several of the forms of healing that are now labeled as alternative we find that their origins go back as much as 5000 years.

From Eastern Philosophy to Widely used Western Alternatives

One of the oldest forms of alternative medicine can be traced back through Chinese history. The ancient Chinese, in much the same way as alternative medicine is used today, based on their healing on the importance of the body and spirit being in balance. Much of the philosophy of Chinese Medicine is based on Taoist and Buddhist principles and the belief that a person and their environment are closely interlinked. The widely known principles of Yin and Yang come from Chinese Medicine and are integral to its practice. Yin and Yang explains how opposing forces are integral to each other and how for harmony within the body to take place, these must be in balance. When these are out of balance, disease occurs.

Chinese Medicine works at restoring balance in various ways including herbal medicine, acupuncture, breathing and movement (Tai Chi and Qigong) and also through diet. The practitioner looked at the patient's health and life in detail to ascertain where their life force or Qi (pronounced Qi) was out of balance. Various methods would then be used to restore the patient back to health. Such was the effectiveness of Chinese Traditional Medicine that it still forms a large part of modern health care in the East. It's not unusual for these "alternative" practices to be used in hospitals alongside western medicine.

The other Eastern Culture that has a long history of alternative medicine is India. Ayurvedic medicine dates back as far as 6000 years ago and like Chinese Medicine also has links with Buddhism. Ayurveda comes from 2 Sanskrit words – Ayu meaning life and veda meaning knowledge of. It is a system of medicine that keeps a persons body, mind and spirit in tune with nature in order to maintain good health.

When in Rome …..

In the West, the History of Alternative Medicine goes back around 3000 years. Treatments such as hydrotherapy were popular with the Romans and Greeks. The Ancient Greeks who were greatly influenced by the Babylonians and to a lesser extent by India and Chinarought herbalism into the West. Hippocrates (c. 460-377 BC), a Greek physician commonly referred to as Father of Medicine, practiced herbal medicine.

During the Middle Ages, Monks in Europe studied and boiled medicinal plants and translated many works on the subject from Arabic. Folk Healers also passed on their knowledge of healing through word of mouth, from Master to Apprentice. The understanding of the power different plants have is ingrained in many native civilizations and has allowed man to understand and thrive in often challenging environments. When the Europeans settled in America they found that the Native Americans had an extensive knowledge of the healing power of their indigenous herbs. Likewise the Aborigines in Australia understood the power of plants found in their environment.

Moving forward in time towards the 19th Century, before the rise of Western Medicine, as we now know it, medical practitioners were more like today's naturopaths. They would take a detailed medical history paying particular attention to the patient's lifestyle. They would then suggest ways to improve this by changes in diet, environment and would also prescribe herbal remedies.

How a Bit of Mold Turned the Tables on Alternative Medicine

The widespread use of alternative medicine in its various forms decreased during the 20th Century. Treatment of patients became more focused on the use of hospitals, and developments in modern medicine lead to the broad use of pharmaceutical drugs to treat disease. The discovery of Penicillin and its development into a drug that could treat bacterial infections in the 1940's revolutionized health care and alternative medicine lost favor with most medical practitioners.

Although many doctors let go of what they considered to be outdated treatments such as homeopathy, herbalism and traditional Chinese medicine many patients still sort out them, especially when conventional medicine did not appear to be working for them.

No Longer An Alternative, Now Another Choice for Achieving Better Health

The result now is that Alternative Medicine is on the increase. Practices such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, aromatherapy and healing are kept alive by practitioners who specialize in one of more alternative form of treatment. Frequent alternatives are used alongside modern medical treatments, which have led to alternatives being given the term complimentary medicine.

This brief history of alternative medicine shows that many of the practices used today have been with us for thousands of years. Given the rising popularity of using alternative medicine to deal with health issues today, it's likely that these practices will be around for many more.



by

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 13, 2017 at 1:41 am

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Alternative Health Careers – Five Occupational Options

Alternative Health Careers – Five Occupational Options

As the field of natural healing therapies continues to grow, so does the demand for alternative health careers. Some of the diverse healthcare occupations that alternative and complementary medicine offer prospective students include healing arts disciplines in massage therapy, homeopathy, herbal medicine, natural health, and acupuncture, among many others.

Today’s alternative health careers like massage therapy require specific training and education; including an expanding minimum standard of 500 instructional hours comprised of basic sciences (anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, and pathology), Swedish massage, deep tissue massage, and sports massage. Other related studies like CPR and first aid, as well as business management and client communications are commonly integrated into this program of study.

Homeopathy is also a unique option to those seeking alternative health careers. Similar to most medical programs, homeopathic courses require rigorous educational studies like anatomy, biochemistry, homeopathic philosophy, physiology, materia medica, and other comprehensive coursework. To successfully acquire alternative health careers in homeopathy, individuals should review educational prerequisites as most homeopathic colleges and schools typically require some formal training and education prior to enrollment.

If you’re drawn to alternative health careers that involve herbal medicine, a number of holistic education programs including Chinese medicine, naturopathy, homeopathy and natural health commonly offer herbology and aromatherapy as part of their curricula. Choose from beginner classes to more advanced training options like earning your degree in herbal sciences.

Natural health professions are also part of the vast array of alternative health careers. Earn your diploma or certificate as a natural health practitioner after you’ve completed an in-depth course in natural healing therapies like massage, aromatherapy, herbal medicine, Reiki, and reflexology. Healing arts schools vary in subject matter, so check with prospective schools prior to applying.

Of these alternative health careers, acupuncture and Oriental medicine practitioners probably have one of the most unique educational foundations. In addition to learning both Eastern and Western medicine philosophies, acupuncture education offers a rare look into Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) principles and theories; including needling techniques, Tai Chi, moxibustion, Chinese herbal medicine, Tuina, Qi gong, and even Chinese medical language, among others. Prospective students should be aware, however, that alternative health careers in acupuncture do require several years of dedication.

If you (or someone you know) are interested in learning more about these and other alternative health career options, let professional training within fast-growing industries like massage therapy, cosmetology, acupuncture, oriental medicine, Reiki, and others get you started! Explore training programs for alternative health careers near you.

Alternative Health Careers – Five Occupational Options
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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - February 14, 2017 at 4:31 am

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