Posts Tagged ‘economics’

Durable healthcare — redesigning a system to work for everyone | Mark Arnoldy | TEDxMileHigh

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. What would it mean to throw out the world “sustainable” when we talk about health care? In this emotional talk, Mark Arnoldy confronts the challenges of modern healthcare in the world’s most challenging places, pointing to what’s possible when we look at improving results and lowering costs here in the U.S.

Mark Arnoldy leads overall strategy; focuses on building a remarkable team; develops partnerships; and makes sure the team never loses sight that everything is impossible until it isn’t for Possible. Prior to Possible, Mark worked closely with a Nepali social entrepreneur for three years to create an innovative way to treat malnourished children, and he helped create two U.S. businesses that fund nutrition programs in Nepal.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - November 29, 2019 at 3:20 pm

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Joe Flower Explains Healthcare Economics In 5 Minutes

(For more on what’s behind the healthcare headlines, go to http://www.ImagineWhatIf.com)

Healthcare Econ 101: Why it costs so much, yet we still don’t get what we want and need—better healthcare that is cheaper.

Joe: First rule of economics: people do what you pay them to do.
Second rule of economics: people do exactly what you pay them to do. They really notice what it is. I’m sure that all of you know exactly what can get you fired, in some detail. And you know exactly what you can do in your jobs to really advance in your jobs, get better at it, make sure of a promotion, make sure they keep you on. You’re very, very clear on that.

Well, so is everyone in the healthcare system. So are the doctors, the nurses, the hospitals, the device manufacturers, the pharmacy manufacturers—they’re very clear on what we’re paying them to do. If we’re not getting them the results that we want, it’s because we’re not clear on what we’re paying them to do.

So, let’s look at Healthcare Econ 101.

Traditional economics, we start with a buyer and a seller. I want to buy a rug, I go to the marketplace, there’s all these guys selling rugs. I haggle with them. If his price is too high, his quality is too low, I go to this guy over here and we come to some kind of agreement. Right? No problem. So, the market is—it’s what people talk about [as] a free market, where it’s kind of self-leveling. We arrive at what the actual value of that rug is in this market, at this time.

Now what happens if you have an insurance supported, fee-for-service system?

See, that actually names what we’re paying them for.
If I go to a restaurant, am I paying someone to fry things or to put ice in them? No, I’m paying for a meal. I don’t care what they do back there to prepare it—a lot about it I [probably] don’t know how to do—but I’m paying for a meal.

This is not what we’re doing. We’re paying fee-for-service.

Now what happens in that fee-for-service system?

Well, the first thing is the buyer gets split in two. The entity that’s paying for it becomes different from whoever that’s choosing it. What we’re saying—yes, we need an MRI here, we need a new hip, we—is not the person who is actually paying for that. Insurance supported, fee-for-service system.

But there’s something—there’s a little complication.
Who’s doing the choosing?

It’s the patient and the provider, together. My doctor and I are doing the choosing, and someone else is paying for it. Or at least paying for most of it.

But there’s another complication to this. What’s this?

The seller is also the provider. So, the doctor’s also a salesman, in the sense that they’re selling their time—they’re doing fee-for-service—and they’re helping me make the choices.

So, the usual feedback loops of a free market system, are not there. A lot of these changes that we’re seeing in the insurance system are attempts to put at least some of that feedback loop back in, so that the person making the decision have at least some of the payment. They have to do some of the payment themselves so we begin to do rational economic decisions, instead of just making them up out of thin air with the advice of the people who are actually going to do the service for us.

So, it’s a very complicated problem.

We try to control cost the entire time—and I’ve been in healthcare for 30 years—and I started around the time that they began trying to do various cost controls and basically, these cost controls have not worked. There is no evidence that we have controlled cost at all over all these years.

So, what cost controls looked like over those many years—there’s been various, lots of different ways of controlling unit cost. We will only pay you so much to see a patient. We will only pay you so much for this drug.

What happens—suppose you’re selling TVs. What happens if the market dictates in some way that the amount that you can charge on this TV is depressed? You can’t charge as much. What are you going to do?

Woman: Sell more.

Joe: Sell more. You’re going to make it up on volume. What’s the other thing that you’re going to do? You’re going to upsell. “You ma’am do not look like the type of person who could use a mere TV. You need a whole entertainment system! Five-sided sound! We got bass cabinets the size of a mini-bus for you.” You know? And you pay like $5800 for this huge thing.

Does that sound like something that we’re doing in healthcare?
Now, many of the new things that we can do that we couldn’t do twenty, thirty years ago, are very helpful. But not all of them. Some of them are not. And we don’t really have a mechanism in place for saying what is helpful and what’s not.

The executives of the companies that you work in. the healthcare executives are being asked to do something they have no experience in doing. They have no training in it. They barely know what it means. They have difficulty seeing their way from where they sit, that they can do this: controlling system cost.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 14, 2019 at 11:21 pm

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

How single-payer health care works, in 2 minutes

Vox explains how single-payer health care systems work — and how well patients do in them.

Subscribe to our channel! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=voxdotcom

Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: youtube.com/voxdotcom/videos
Follow Vox on Twitter: https://twitter.com/voxdotcom
Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Vox

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - September 19, 2019 at 11:20 am

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Healthcare Stole the American Dream – Here’s How We Take it Back | Dave Chase | TEDxSunValley

The middle class is being crushed by skyrocketing healthcare costs, but there are common sense solutions to save it. Dave Chase gives us a non-political road map to solving one of America’s biggest problems.

Dave Chase is co-founder of the Health Rosetta and was named one of the most influential people in Digital Health due to his entrepreneurial success, public speaking & writing that recognizes healthcare’s under-performance but contrasts that with a growing cadre of high-performing organizations that have solved healthcare’s toughest challenges. Chase, widely published, co-authored the healthcare Book of the Year in in 2014. Chase was the CEO & Co-founder of Avado, which was acquired by and integrated into WebMD and the most widely used healthcare professional site – Medscape. Before Avado, Chase spent several years outside of healthcare in startups as founder or consulting roles with LiveRez.com, MarketLeader, & WhatCounts. He also played founding & leadership roles in launching two new $1B+ businesses within Microsoft including their $2 billion healthcare platform business. Chase is a father of two great kids/athletes, husband & oxygen-fueled mountain athlete.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - August 28, 2019 at 3:21 pm

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why Can’t America Have a Grown-Up Healthcare Conversation?

In which John discusses the tradeoffs involved in health care reform, and why the 70% of Americans who are happy with their personal health care make it difficult to achieve more than incremental changes in the very expensive, very inefficient health care system in the United States. SOURCES:

First off, subscribe to Healthcare Triage, where this stuff is discussed with far more detail and nuance: https://www.youtube.com/user/thehealthcaretriage

Only 32% of Americans think our healthcare system is good or excellent, but 69% are happy with their personal health care: http://www.gallup.com/poll/165998/americans-views-healthcare-quality-cost-coverage.aspx

Over at the incidental economist, Aaron Carroll and Austin Frakt have written a LOT about the quality of U.S. healthcare outcomes compared to other countries. Intros here: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/the-state-of-us-health-aint-so-good/ and here: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/how-do-we-rate-the-quality-of-the-us-health-care-system-introduction/

The Kaiser Foundation has up-to-date stats on where people get their health insurance–the ACA exchanges get coverage to about 6% of people, 49% of people get coverage through their employers (or their family’s employer), 20% through Medicaid, 14% through Medicare, and 9% are uninfured: http://kff.org/other/state-indicator/total-population/?currentTimeframe=0&sortModel=%7B%22colId%22:%22Location%22,%22sort%22:%22asc%22%7D

Healthcare costs in the U.S. are very, very high compared to every other wealthy country, and have been for decades: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_care_in_the_United_States#Overall_costs

A Medicare-for-All program would lead to lower overall healthcare costs in the U.S., but also a lot of job loss (possibly as many as two million): http://money.cnn.com/2016/01/25/news/economy/sanders-health-care-plan/

Even modest reductions in health insurance subsidies–like those proposed in the GOP repeal and replace of the Affordable Care Act–would lead to tens of millions of people losing insurance coverage: https://www.cbo.gov/publication/52371

Other topics discussed include the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the relative modesty of Obamacare as a health care reform, and the benefits and tradeoffs of Bernie Sanders’ proposed single payer healthcare system, Medicare for All.

—-
Subscribe to our newsletter! http://nerdfighteria.com/newsletter/
And join the community at http://nerdfighteria.com http://effyeahnerdfighters.com
Help transcribe videos – http://nerdfighteria.info
John’s twitter – http://twitter.com/johngreen
John’s tumblr – http://fishingboatproceeds.tumblr.com
Hank’s twitter – http://twitter.com/hankgreen
Hank’s tumblr – http://edwardspoonhands.tumblr.com

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - August 20, 2019 at 7:21 pm

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why is our healthcare system always in crisis? | Dr. Bill Ghali | TEDxCalgary

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Dr. William Ghali explores the dimensions and trade-offs of our health care system, compares the Canadian model to US health care system and other global healthcare systems, ultimately pushing us to examine the elements behind good health care that are universal.

Dr. William Ghali, MD, MPH, is the Scientific Director of the O’Brien Institute for Public Health at the University of Calgary. He is also a Professor in the Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences at the University of Calgary, and a practicing physician specialized in Internal Medicine.

He conducts health services research and his work focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to evaluating and improving health system performance to produce better patient outcomes and improved system efficiency. He leads or co-leads three inter-related research and innovation initiatives: the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcome Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease (APPROACH); the Ward of the 21st Century initiative (W21C); and International Methodology Consortium for Coded Health Information (IMECCHI), with strong linkages to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Dr. Ghali has has published over 350 papers in peer-reviewed journals. In April 2012, The Globe and Mail named his as the Canadian public health researcher with the highest publication H-index, a bibliometric measure of publication impact. He recently completed two terms as a Canada Research Chair in Health Services Research.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 3:22 pm

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Why we can’t fix our healthcare system | Ayesha Khalid | TEDxBeaconStreet

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Ayesha Khalid, surgeon at Harvard Medical School and recent MBA from the MIT Sloan Fellows Program, is at the intersection of disruptive innovation in healthcare and the digital health experience. Ayesha previously pioneered groundbreaking research in sinus disease including muco-ciliary clearance and outcomes following surgery. She is now a passionate believer that disruptive innovation in healthcare requires collaboration, not competition. Using a systems thinking approach, Ayesha wants us to suspend our belief that adding more process to our healthcare system will add back “health” and “care” to a broken system. Instead, this compelling talk provides an imaginative way to approach the redesign of our health care system to one that promotes “health” and works “systematically” for the patient.

A sinus surgeon at Harvard Medical School and recent MBA graduate from MIT, Ayesha Khalid is a healthcare innovation enthusiast involved with entrepreneurial ventures at the intersection of healthcare innovation and digital technologies. She has pioneered groundbreaking research techniques in inflammation and sinus disease and is working to create different funding paradigms to accelerate clinical research.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 9, 2019 at 11:20 am

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

What if all US health care costs were transparent? | Jeanne Pinder

In the US, the very same blood test can cost $19 at one clinic and $522 at another clinic just blocks away — and nobody knows the difference until they get a bill weeks later. Journalist Jeanne Pinder says it doesn’t have to be this way. She’s built a platform that crowdsources the true costs of medical procedures and makes the data public, revealing the secrets of health care pricing. Learn how knowing what stuff costs in advance could make us healthier, save us money — and help fix a broken system.

Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 21, 2019 at 3:20 am

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Health Care is a Mess… But Why?

You probably know a couple who both work full time to support their children, but even with their dual incomes, they’re finding it more and more difficult to afford health insurance. Everyday incidents like sports injuries, asthma, and blood pressure, combined with their anxiety over rising premiums, are turning their American dream into sleepless nights. Why can’t people catch a break? It wasn’t always this way!

Check out the transcript of this episode aind out more about how we got here at FEE: https://fee.org/articles/health-care-is-a-mess-but-why/

And download FEE’s new Essential Guide to Health Care Reform: http://hubs.ly/H087jP20

________________
Written by Seamus Coughlin & Sean Malone
Animated by Seamus Coughlin

Special thanks to Michael Cannon.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 28, 2019 at 3:20 am

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Why Are American Health Care Costs So High?

In which John discusses the complicated reasons why the United States spends so much more on health care than any other country in the world, and along the way reveals some surprising information, including that Americans spend more of their tax dollars on public health care than people in Canada, the UK, or Australia. Who’s at fault? Insurance companies? Drug companies? Malpractice lawyers? Hospitals? Or is it more complicated than a simple blame game? (Hint: It’s that one.)

For a much more thorough examination of health care expenses in America, I recommend this series at The Incidental Economist: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/what-makes-the-us-health-care-system-so-expensive-introduction/
The Commonwealth Fund’s Study of Health Care Prices in the US: http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Issue%20Brief/2012/May/1595_Squires_explaining_high_hlt_care_spending_intl_brief.pdf
Some of the stats in this video also come from this New York Times story: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/health/colonoscopies-explain-why-us-leads-the-world-in-health-expenditures.html?pagewanted=all

This is the first part in what will be a periodic series on health care costs and reforms leading up to the introduction of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, in 2014.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - November 23, 2018 at 3:22 am

Categories: Health care online   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »