Posts Tagged ‘developing world’

Bridging the rural healthcare gap | Rubayat Khan | TEDxDhaka

The healthcare-delivery scene in rural developing world is unimaginable sitting in the big cities. Most of the people go to a ‘person who is not a doctor,’ when they are sick. They go to the trusted pharmacy owner around the corner, as often the nearest healthcare facility is miles away. Rubayat Khan, a Bangladeshi entrepreneur considers how technology and market mechanisms can help bridge these health care gaps tapping into unique alternatives.

Rubayat Khan
Healthcare Entrepreneur

Rubayat Khan is a Bangladeshi entrepreneur passionate about bridging the rural healthcare gap sustainably using technology and market mechanisms. Straddling the intersections between public health, social enterprise, technology and data science, Rubayat’s organization Jeeon is working with the belief that 3 Billion rural people can be reached for the first time with modern healthcare services.

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Recorded at TEDxDhaka http://bit.ly/TEDxDhaka2017 on 18th November, 2017, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Rubayat Khan is a Bangladeshi entrepreneur passionate about bridging the rural healthcare gap sustainably using technology and market mechanisms. Straddling the intersections between public health, social enterprise, technology and data science, Rubayat’s organization Jeeon is working with the belief that 3 Billion rural people can be reached for the first time with modern healthcare services. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - September 11, 2019 at 3:20 am

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How to do more with less in healthcare | Jan Denecker | TED Institute

As medicine advances, so does the complexity and price of healthcare. For inspiration on ways to keep healthcare affordable, Jan Denecker shares three simple, yet effective innovations from the developing world, where constraints on resources have caused the healthcare industry to adopt a mentality of doing more with less.

TED@UPS Atlanta unlocked the opportunities of the question “What if?” Daring to engage with the boundless future, speakers explored innovations in language, trade and technology to imagine a future full of possibilities for all.

About the TED Institute: We know that innovative ideas and fresh approaches to challenging problems can be discovered inside visionary companies around the world. The TED Institute helps surface and share these insights. Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas.

Learn more at http://www.ted.com/ted-institute

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - August 19, 2019 at 3:21 pm

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Improving access to healthcare: too big to solve alone

Imagine if your drive to the doctor weren’t a drive at all — that’s only the beginning of the challenge of improving access to healthcare in the developing world.

To learn more visit: http://socialbusiness.novartis.com

© 2011 Novartis AG

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 7, 2019 at 3:20 am

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GE Foundation, Duke University World Healthcare Tech Lab, and Engineering World Health Establish Biomedical Equipment Training Program in Nigeria to Build Skills and Improve Capacity | Business Wire

ABUJA, Nigeria–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The GE Foundation, in collaboration with the Developing World Healthcare

Technology Laboratory at Duke University and Engineering World Health,

is developing a new Biomedical Equipment Technician Training (BMET)

project in Nigeria to address a major need for locally qualified medical

technicians to repair and service biomedical equipment. The grant

program, defined through collaboration with the Federal Ministry of

Health (FMOH) in Nigeria, will be established at the Federal School of

Biomedical Engineering Technology at the Lagos University Teaching

Hospital (LUTH) and builds on the success of BMET programs already

implemented in Rwanda, Ghana, Cambodia and Honduras. The $1.5M grant

will be administered over a three-year period.

Between 50- 80% of medical equipment is out of service in low-income

countries according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Additionally, of hospitals surveyed, 85% in Africa, 77% in Latin America

and 60% in Asia report difficulty finding qualified medical technicians

to repair and service medical equipment. In Nigeria, 50% of hospital

equipment is out of service which puts added strain on local healthcare

delivery.

“The shortage of functional medical equipment is a barrier to the

efficient delivery of care in Sub-Saharan Africa,” said David M. Barash,

M.D., Executive Director and Chief Medical Officer of the GE Foundation.

“This capacity-building program delivers a structured curriculum and

develops a pipeline of locally accredited technicians, in line with GE’s

overall commitment to drive knowledge transfer, capabilities building

and local job creation. We are pleased to collaborate with the Nigerian

Ministry of Health on this scalable program to help address the health

challenges in the region and deliver solutions that align with the needs

of the country.”

The goal of the three-year grant is to establish a BMET school in

Nigeria, while also working to create a Center of Excellence (COE) in

coordination with the Federal School of Biomedical Engineering

Technology and LUTH. The COE’s goal is to serve as a model for other

training programs in the region.

“Across the region, donated and purchased equipment sits idle due to the

lack of skilled engineers who can install, maintain or repair it,” said

Edward Hutton, Chief Operating Officer at Engineering World Health.

“Since we started this training program in 2009, the goal has always

been to build a local, sustainable, trained workforce of technicians

that can fill these critical gaps in care. We are proud to be continuing

our work in Nigeria and with our valued partners.”

The BMET training program is unique to each country served. It features

needs-based curricula tailored to each country in partnership with Duke

University’s Developing World Technology Lab, headed by Dr. Robert

Malkin. In Nigeria, training will be delivered through twelve 4-week

modules, delivered over three years in classroom, laboratory, field

practicum, and exam components. Students learn about healthcare

technology management, computer skills, principles of medical device

operation, and professional development. They are taught a broad base of

skills that apply to the maintenance and repair of numerous types of

biomedical equipment.

“Our research has shown that the impact of programs that provide the

appropriate levels of training and ongoing support can be tremendous,”

said Dr. Malkin. “The training we provide through this program ensures

that local institutions and providers own the process of training

technicians and, as a result, build their community’s confidence in the

local health system. In the end, this will help maximize the value of

donated equipment in the region and dramatically break down this barrier

to the delivery of care.”

The BMET Project first launched in 2009 in Rwanda with 38 technicians

graduating in 2012 and another 67 currently enrolled in the program.

Since then, projects were set up in Honduras (2010), Ghana (2012) and

Cambodia (2013) training nearly 200 technicians and establishing nearly

10 COEs.

Building competencies in healthcare is a central pillar of GE’s

localization strategy in Nigeria. Focusing on education, training and

development and through partnership with the FMOH, GE has trained 300

clinicians on Clinical Leadership, Technical Support and Life Support

and increased clinical capacity for healthcare workers.

About Engineering World Health

Engineering World Health (EWH) is a non-profit organization that

mobilizes the biomedical engineering community to improve the quality of

health care in hospitals that serve resource-poor communities. We

inspire, educate, and empower the biomedical engineering community to

improve health care delivery in the developing world. EWH is a dynamic

global organization serving engineering students, healthcare

professionals, communities around the world and, most importantly,

patients in need. EWH supports training programs in Asia, Africa and

Latin America that are building a workforce of in-country biomedical

engineering technicians and instructors. Working in partnership with

local hospitals, educational institutions and governments, EWH is

improving local capacity to run efficient hospitals up to international

standards now and in the future.

About Duke University Developing World Healthcare Technology

Laboratory

The Developing World Healthcare Technology Laboratory (DHT Lab) at Duke

University is dedicated to understanding, creating and disseminating

healthcare technology to the world’s neediest. It develops new

technologies to address unmet needs, supports and assesses programs to

train hospital technicians in the developing world, conducts research

that informs practice and policy, and mentors the next generation of

innovators and designers.

About the GE Foundation

The GE Foundation, the philanthropic organization of GE, is committed to

building a world that works better. We empower people by helping them

build the skills they need to succeed in a global economy. We equip

communities with the technology and capacity to improve access to better

health and education. We elevate ideas that are tackling the world’s

toughest challenges to advance economic development and improve lives.

The GE Foundation is powered by the generosity and talent of our

employees, who have a strong commitment to their communities. We are at

work making the world work better. Follow the GE Foundation at www.gefoundation.com

and on Twitter at @GE_Foundation.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 28, 2017 at 6:42 am

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